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Building Your Diabetes Support Team

Diabetes can be overwhelming, but you do not have to go it alone. The theme of World Diabetes Day 2018 is “Family and Diabetes,” which has us thinking about the ways diabetes can actually help our families grow closer and healthier together. That may not have been what you thought of when you read the word diabetes, but it is true. Regular communication about our health and how we feel with those closest to us can have a positive impact for you and the ones you love. As you look at those around you to develop your team that can help you navigate your life with diabetes, the following is a list of the people...

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Treatment

Diabetes does not have a cure, but it is treatable. With the proper treatment plan, you can reduce or even prevent the complications related to diabetes. Common treatments for diabetes include insulin injections, oral medications, diet and exercise. Work closely with your healthcare team to create the best treatment plan for you. Over time, hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) can cause health problems. Diabetes has been linked to: 1 Heart disease Heart attacks Strokes Kidney disease Nerve damage Digestive problems...

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Change 1 Thing, Improve Your Life

There are probably many things that each of us would like to change about our life, but thinking about them all at once can be overwhelming. Instead, choose just 1 thing to improve for now. Changing any one of the things below could have a big impact on your life with diabetes – both your physical health, and your emotional well-being. Make testing matter For people with diabetes, testing more often  is the key to staying in control of your health. Frequent testing provides the data you need to make informed decisions about your medication, diet, and exercise regimens. Your test results show you the...

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Alternative Site Testing (AST)

Some blood glucose meters allow you to use blood samples from other parts of the body, such as the palm, forearm, upper arm, thigh or calf. Testing from alternate sites is not always ideal. Blood from your fingertip shows changes in blood sugar quickly, but blood from alternate sites may not, and you may not get the most accurate result.1 Always consult with your healthcare professional before using sites other than your fingertip for blood sugar testing. Alternate site testing, or AST, may be recommended when blood sugar is stable, such as immediately before a meal or before bedtime. AST is not recommended when blood...

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Oral Treatment

Many people with type 2 diabetes still create insulin, but their bodies either do not make enough or do not use it as effectively as they should. Often, healthcare professionals start people with diabetes on a therapy of diet and exercise. If these are not enough, the healthcare professional may prescribe oral medications. If medication still does help control blood sugar levels, insulin may be added to a person’s therapy. Today’s oral drugs offer more options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because various medications work in different ways, healthcare professionals may be able to add drugs together for better...

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Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones and weight gain block a woman’s body's ability to use insulin properly. This type of diabetes can effect women who have never had diabetes. Gestational diabetes may affect as many as 7% of pregnant women.1 This type of diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can lead to high blood pressure for the mother and high birth weight for the baby. There is also an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes for both you and your baby in the future. Your baby may also be at higher risk of childhood obesity.2 You can reduce these risks by...

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HbA1C

The HbA1c test (also known as A1c or glycated hemoglobin) measures your average blood sugar levels over a period of time by taking a sample of a specific component of your red blood cells—hemoglobin A1C molecules. Some blood sugar naturally attaches itself to these A1C molecules as the molecules move through your bloodstream. When this happens, the molecule is considered "glycated." The more sugar in your blood, the more glycated A1C molecules you will have.1 The A1C test is not a substitute for frequent self-monitoring. It shows the average amount of blood sugar in the body over the last 3–4 months....

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Insulin Treatment

Insulin is a natural hormone made in your pancreas. It moves blood glucose from your blood into your cells. If your body cannot produce its own insulin, it may be necessary to take insulin in order to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Insulin can be injected using a syringe or a pen, or through an insulin pump. Insulin cannot be taken in pill form because the acids in the stomach will break it down. There are a variety of insulin types, brands and sources. Healthcare professionals often prescribe 2 types of insulin: mealtime insulin and background insulin. Mealtime insulin (bolus) is used to control after-meal blood glucose...

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Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes represents more than 90% of all diabetes cases.1 In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas may make enough insulin, but the body cannot effectively use the insulin it creates. This is known as insulin resistance. Eventually, the pancreas may stop producing insulin altogether. Type 2 diabetes traditionally affects people later in life, but can affect people at any age. Additional risk factors or characteristics for type 2 diabetes include Family history of diabetes History of gestational diabetes Obesity Race/Ethnicity such as...

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